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What is the difference between MBA and EMBA?

Mojo77

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Nov 25, 2006 06:15

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This is what I got so; any other comments?

"Different levels of management have different needs. The Executive MBA is targeted at older, more experienced individuals who consciously want to enhance their ability to conceptualise rather than their proficiency in functional management. The MBA is aimed at the younger manager who wants to hone his/her management skills. As such, the MBA is strong on content in respect of the core disciplines of management, whereas the Executive MBA assumes a basic competence in the fundamentals of business and emphasises process, insight and the application of new learning."

http://www.gsb.uct.ac.za/gsbwebb/default.asp?intpagenr=580

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"Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a master's degree in business administration, which attracts people from a wide range of academic disciplines.

Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) programs were first established for senior executives by the University of Chicago in 1943 and are now offered by many schools worldwide.

An EMBA is essentially a part-time MBA, but the average student profile is slightly different. These programs are aimed at experienced executives who prefer not to take a career break to take a full-time MBA and typically require significant business experience to gain admission. Unlike their counterparts on full-time MBA programmes, EMBA students are able to implement and practice what they learn in the classroom in their job as they learn and there are greater opportunities to learn from classmates."

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1006052314268
This is what I got so; any other comments?

"Different levels of management have different needs. The Executive MBA is targeted at older, more experienced individuals who consciously want to enhance their ability to conceptualise rather than their proficiency in functional management. The MBA is aimed at the younger manager who wants to hone his/her management skills. As such, the MBA is strong on content in respect of the core disciplines of management, whereas the Executive MBA assumes a basic competence in the fundamentals of business and emphasises process, insight and the application of new learning."

http://www.gsb.uct.ac.za/gsbwebb/default.asp?intpagenr=580

---

"Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a master's degree in business administration, which attracts people from a wide range of academic disciplines.

Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) programs were first established for senior executives by the University of Chicago in 1943 and are now offered by many schools worldwide.

An EMBA is essentially a part-time MBA, but the average student profile is slightly different. These programs are aimed at experienced executives who prefer not to take a career break to take a full-time MBA and typically require significant business experience to gain admission. Unlike their counterparts on full-time MBA programmes, EMBA students are able to implement and practice what they learn in the classroom in their job as they learn and there are greater opportunities to learn from classmates."

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1006052314268

Irena

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Nov 29, 2006 09:50

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So do applicants for an EMBA have previously accomplished an MBA program? If so, is it a condition to be accepted in an EMBA?
So do applicants for an EMBA have previously accomplished an MBA program? If so, is it a condition to be accepted in an EMBA?

Hiroko

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Nov 30, 2006 08:17

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Now here's another question: What is the difference between MBA and IMBA? Is the IMBA a specific category with certain requirements like EMBA or do they call it "International" simply because some study units take place outside the country?
Now here's another question: What is the difference between MBA and IMBA? Is the IMBA a specific category with certain requirements like EMBA or do they call it "International" simply because some study units take place outside the country?

Dec 03, 2006 10:17

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So do applicants for an EMBA have previously accomplished an MBA program? If so, is it a condition to be accepted in an EMBA?


You do not need to have done an MBA already when applying to an EMBA. An EMBA is just a type of MBA program that suits working professionals who have already acquired substantial management experience.

Executive MBA (EMBA) programs are geared toward enhancing the careers of working executives, many of whom are company sponsored. These programs are for professionals who are already specialists in a field or industry and need to hone their general management skills to continue up the corporate ladder.

* Enrollment is often tied to a new or anticipated promotion.
* Students' professional experience and expertise become part of the fabric of the curriculum.
* Classes typically meet on Fridays and Saturdays, usually on alternate weekends, over two academic years.
* EMBA programs offer full immersion, with learning outside the classroom and extensive faculty and student/team interaction.

EMBA Programs Differ from Full-Time Programs

* Because they are fully employed, EMBA students do not hold internships between their first and second years of school.
* University scholarships are generally not available for EMBA students, but loan programs such as the Graduate Management Admission Council's MBA LOANS are.
* There is limited or no opportunity to specialize. Students all take the same general management curriculum at the same time, rather than core courses one year and electives the next.

Executive MBA Advantages

EMBA programs have several advantages for executives who need career-broadening management training:

* They feature a well-constructed curriculum of several courses in each of the major business disciplines.
* They usually do not require permanent relocation, making them good for those who can travel virtually anywhere on a regular basis.
* EMBAs earn their degree in two years or less, faster than their part-time counterparts.

Executive MBA Limitations

EMBA programs require a high level of commitment from the students, their families, and their employers.

* Most EMBA students put in 80 to 100 hours a week between job and school.
* Employers must agree to give EMBA students time off from work to attend classes.
* Because classroom time can be squeezed into four days per month, absences from class are not tolerated.

In addition, company-sponsored EMBA students generally do not take part in career services activities to avoid a conflict of interest.

http://www.mba.com/mba/FindYourProgram/ChooseAProgramType/ExecutiveMBAPrograms.htm
<blockquote>So do applicants for an EMBA have previously accomplished an MBA program? If so, is it a condition to be accepted in an EMBA?</blockquote>

You do not need to have done an MBA already when applying to an EMBA. An EMBA is just a type of MBA program that suits working professionals who have already acquired substantial management experience.

Executive MBA (EMBA) programs are geared toward enhancing the careers of working executives, many of whom are company sponsored. These programs are for professionals who are already specialists in a field or industry and need to hone their general management skills to continue up the corporate ladder.

* Enrollment is often tied to a new or anticipated promotion.
* Students' professional experience and expertise become part of the fabric of the curriculum.
* Classes typically meet on Fridays and Saturdays, usually on alternate weekends, over two academic years.
* EMBA programs offer full immersion, with learning outside the classroom and extensive faculty and student/team interaction.

EMBA Programs Differ from Full-Time Programs

* Because they are fully employed, EMBA students do not hold internships between their first and second years of school.
* University scholarships are generally not available for EMBA students, but loan programs such as the Graduate Management Admission Council's MBA LOANS are.
* There is limited or no opportunity to specialize. Students all take the same general management curriculum at the same time, rather than core courses one year and electives the next.

Executive MBA Advantages

EMBA programs have several advantages for executives who need career-broadening management training:

* They feature a well-constructed curriculum of several courses in each of the major business disciplines.
* They usually do not require permanent relocation, making them good for those who can travel virtually anywhere on a regular basis.
* EMBAs earn their degree in two years or less, faster than their part-time counterparts.

Executive MBA Limitations

EMBA programs require a high level of commitment from the students, their families, and their employers.

* Most EMBA students put in 80 to 100 hours a week between job and school.
* Employers must agree to give EMBA students time off from work to attend classes.
* Because classroom time can be squeezed into four days per month, absences from class are not tolerated.

In addition, company-sponsored EMBA students generally do not take part in career services activities to avoid a conflict of interest.

http://www.mba.com/mba/FindYourProgram/ChooseAProgramType/ExecutiveMBAPrograms.htm

Dec 03, 2006 10:36

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quote

Now here's another question: What is the difference between MBA and IMBA? Is the IMBA a specific category with certain requirements like EMBA or do they call it "International" simply because some study units take place outside the country?


IMBA does not necessarily mean that studies take place in several countries. The "I" means that the program has an international orientation.
<blockquote>Now here's another question: What is the difference between MBA and IMBA? Is the IMBA a specific category with certain requirements like EMBA or do they call it "International" simply because some study units take place outside the country?</blockquote>

IMBA does not necessarily mean that studies take place in several countries. The "I" means that the program has an international orientation.

Jul 27, 2008 07:27

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quote

Hello,

I would like to understand how the employers consider E-MBA and a full time MBA.

I have close to 8 years of professional work experience.I am planning apply for executive MBA with HEC Geneva University.

Post completion of e-MBA, if I have to cange my job, I would like to know how will European employers/American employers value the executive MBA?
Your responses will be very helpful in order to choose the executive MBA program.
Hello,

I would like to understand how the employers consider E-MBA and a full time MBA.

I have close to 8 years of professional work experience.I am planning apply for executive MBA with HEC Geneva University.

Post completion of e-MBA, if I have to cange my job, I would like to know how will European employers/American employers value the executive MBA?
Your responses will be very helpful in order to choose the executive MBA program.

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