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Exec MBA for non domestic students

BigD

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Sep 17, 2012 03:19

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I have run into a bit of a problem regarding Australian universities. Non domestic students are not permitted to enrolled on part time courses with a student visa (condition of visa).

However the universities also seem to exclude those with long term temp (4yr) visas from such modes of attendance.

The impression I get is that it is a university decision rather than a government restriction.

Does anyone have any experience of undertaking a part-time or Exec MBA while not a permanent resident/citizen ?

Thanks
BigD
I have run into a bit of a problem regarding Australian universities. Non domestic students are not permitted to enrolled on part time courses with a student visa (condition of visa). However the universities also seem to exclude those with long term temp (4yr) visas from such modes of attendance. The impression I get is that it is a university decision rather than a government restriction. Does anyone have any experience of undertaking a part-time or Exec MBA while not a permanent resident/citizen ? Thanks BigD

donho199

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Sep 17, 2012 05:42

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Not sure about Australia but I would rather think that as long as I maintain leave to remain or legal residential status then why do they care? Anyways it should be none of their business.

University is for mind not border control agency
Not sure about Australia but I would rather think that as long as I maintain leave to remain or legal residential status then why do they care? Anyways it should be none of their business. University is for mind not border control agency

BigD

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Sep 17, 2012 05:54

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Since I posted that I have have checked with several universities and anything other than a permanent visa = international student which mean no part-time or even onshore remote possible.

As a number of the Knight reforms were intended to make the higher ed sector more commercially profitable, I find this position just stupid.

So NUS Singapore looks like the next best option, or a low attendance like Warwick or Manchester.

BigD
Since I posted that I have have checked with several universities and anything other than a permanent visa = international student which mean no part-time or even onshore remote possible. As a number of the Knight reforms were intended to make the higher ed sector more commercially profitable, I find this position just stupid. So NUS Singapore looks like the next best option, or a low attendance like Warwick or Manchester. BigD

donho199

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Sep 18, 2012 03:00

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So are you thinking of moving again?

I would say NUS is the indisputable program of choice in Singapore. Chicago is far too senior and costly while INSEAD never have the same network.

NUS continue to expand with exponential growth and soon it will be the biggest university in the whole Asia.

Manchester has more future than Warwick.
So are you thinking of moving again? I would say NUS is the indisputable program of choice in Singapore. Chicago is far too senior and costly while INSEAD never have the same network. NUS continue to expand with exponential growth and soon it will be the biggest university in the whole Asia. Manchester has more future than Warwick.

BigD

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Sep 18, 2012 12:56

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I get to Australia QLD early 2013 :-)

The options for me as a non-permanent expat in Aus are basically:

1) do an Exec MBA local in Aus (which doesn't seem feasible part-time without permanent residence visa)

2) Do a Mancs Warwick distance thang

3) commute for the modules and do an Exec MBA at Singapore NUS or even more extreme Oxford Said (with which I am familiar)

4) do a full time Aus MBA qual

The cohort thing is valuable. If there is to be minimal cohort then I may as well do an alternative minimum contact business qual, even a remote DBA (cranfield/mancs/durham etc).

The Australian Group-of-8 university exec MBAs are 70kAUD+ (of my cash which they are missing out on), but few seem to have developed worldwide brand or ranking.

BigD

So are you thinking of moving again?

I would say NUS is the indisputable program of choice in Singapore. Chicago is far too senior and costly while INSEAD never have the same network.

NUS continue to expand with exponential growth and soon it will be the biggest university in the whole Asia.

Manchester has more future than Warwick.

I get to Australia QLD early 2013 :-) The options for me as a non-permanent expat in Aus are basically: 1) do an Exec MBA local in Aus (which doesn't seem feasible part-time without permanent residence visa) 2) Do a Mancs Warwick distance thang 3) commute for the modules and do an Exec MBA at Singapore NUS or even more extreme Oxford Said (with which I am familiar) 4) do a full time Aus MBA qual The cohort thing is valuable. If there is to be minimal cohort then I may as well do an alternative minimum contact business qual, even a remote DBA (cranfield/mancs/durham etc). The Australian Group-of-8 university exec MBAs are 70kAUD+ (of my cash which they are missing out on), but few seem to have developed worldwide brand or ranking. BigD <blockquote>So are you thinking of moving again? I would say NUS is the indisputable program of choice in Singapore. Chicago is far too senior and costly while INSEAD never have the same network. NUS continue to expand with exponential growth and soon it will be the biggest university in the whole Asia. Manchester has more future than Warwick. </blockquote>

donho199

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Sep 18, 2012 03:15

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I think Australia is a very open place where they treat you depending on your skills sets and not what you look like or where you graduate from

Singapore is also open to people from outside. They hire people from South East Asia where they cant even pronounce the university properly so no worry about certification.

I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value.

Anything related to the UK is treated with utmost respect in these former colonies and honestly they Graduate Diploma from Said may earn you more respect than a Master from NUS if you are in Australia or a Master from Melbourne if you are in Singapore.

Welcome to the Kellogg college again.
I think Australia is a very open place where they treat you depending on your skills sets and not what you look like or where you graduate from Singapore is also open to people from outside. They hire people from South East Asia where they cant even pronounce the university properly so no worry about certification. I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value. Anything related to the UK is treated with utmost respect in these former colonies and honestly they Graduate Diploma from Said may earn you more respect than a Master from NUS if you are in Australia or a Master from Melbourne if you are in Singapore. Welcome to the Kellogg college again.

BigD

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Sep 20, 2012 10:19

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The Australian non-nonsense approach can mean anything with status has to be handled carefully to avoid the "Tall Poppy" resentment. That said I think the brands do matter. I was really surprised at the expense of the Australian MBAs, and courses in general. A two-year Masters in Business or Porject Management etc (UQ or QUT) will cost foreigners about 40kAUD and the MBA 70kAUD+. When you consider LBS at 58kGBP and Oxford at 52kGBP I am not convinced that an Australian MBA represents the best value unless one intended to stay in Australia. An NUS "Asia Pacific EMBA" appears to offer a great deal of diversity: several of the six two-week modules in India, China and Philippines to give a good overview of the region.

Kellogg college? Are you referring to the Oxford Kellogg college or the US original. I am not sure Brasenose has the same recognition but it certainly has an extensive history...

BigD

I think Australia is a very open place where they treat you depending on your skills sets and not what you look like or where you graduate from

Singapore is also open to people from outside. They hire people from South East Asia where they cant even pronounce the university properly so no worry about certification.

I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value.

Anything related to the UK is treated with utmost respect in these former colonies and honestly they Graduate Diploma from Said may earn you more respect than a Master from NUS if you are in Australia or a Master from Melbourne if you are in Singapore.

Welcome to the Kellogg college again.
The Australian non-nonsense approach can mean anything with status has to be handled carefully to avoid the "Tall Poppy" resentment. That said I think the brands do matter. I was really surprised at the expense of the Australian MBAs, and courses in general. A two-year Masters in Business or Porject Management etc (UQ or QUT) will cost foreigners about 40kAUD and the MBA 70kAUD+. When you consider LBS at 58kGBP and Oxford at 52kGBP I am not convinced that an Australian MBA represents the best value unless one intended to stay in Australia. An NUS "Asia Pacific EMBA" appears to offer a great deal of diversity: several of the six two-week modules in India, China and Philippines to give a good overview of the region. Kellogg college? Are you referring to the Oxford Kellogg college or the US original. I am not sure Brasenose has the same recognition but it certainly has an extensive history... BigD <blockquote>I think Australia is a very open place where they treat you depending on your skills sets and not what you look like or where you graduate from Singapore is also open to people from outside. They hire people from South East Asia where they cant even pronounce the university properly so no worry about certification. I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value. Anything related to the UK is treated with utmost respect in these former colonies and honestly they Graduate Diploma from Said may earn you more respect than a Master from NUS if you are in Australia or a Master from Melbourne if you are in Singapore. Welcome to the Kellogg college again. </blockquote>

ezra

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Sep 21, 2012 04:44

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I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value.

That's a good idea. Oxford offers this 21-day Advanced Management and Leadership Program, which, content-wise, seems close to a general management program:

http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/2968

Of course, it's pricey, but not as much as a full-on EMBA program. Could add some value and allow you to tap into Said's network.
<blockquote>I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value.</blockquote> That's a good idea. Oxford offers this 21-day Advanced Management and Leadership Program, which, content-wise, seems close to a general management program: http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/2968 Of course, it's pricey, but not as much as a full-on EMBA program. Could add some value and allow you to tap into Said's network.

BigD

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Sep 21, 2012 05:36

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They also do Diplomas in Financial Strategy, Global Business and Strategy and Innovation. They are very good as they establish a cohort and Oxford vibe at a quarter of the cost of the EMBA, and either act as a feed-in to the intensive EMBA (with financial discount and exemptions) or to cherry-pick areas of interest if you already have an MBA/MSc/PhD.

BigD


I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value.

That's a good idea. Oxford offers this 21-day Advanced Management and Leadership Program, which, content-wise, seems close to a general management program:

http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/2968

Of course, it's pricey, but not as much as a full-on EMBA program. Could add some value and allow you to tap into Said's network.
They also do Diplomas in Financial Strategy, Global Business and Strategy and Innovation. They are very good as they establish a cohort and Oxford vibe at a quarter of the cost of the EMBA, and either act as a feed-in to the intensive EMBA (with financial discount and exemptions) or to cherry-pick areas of interest if you already have an MBA/MSc/PhD. BigD <blockquote><blockquote>I suggest you do a exec cert from Said which is extremely expensive but has the boast value.</blockquote> That's a good idea. Oxford offers this 21-day Advanced Management and Leadership Program, which, content-wise, seems close to a general management program: http://www.nextexecutive.com/courses/2968 Of course, it's pricey, but not as much as a full-on EMBA program. Could add some value and allow you to tap into Said's network.</blockquote>

_

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Sep 21, 2012 05:03

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They also do Diplomas in Financial Strategy, Global Business and Strategy and Innovation. They are very good as they establish a cohort and Oxford vibe at a quarter of the cost of the EMBA, and either act as a feed-in to the intensive EMBA (with financial discount and exemptions) or to cherry-pick areas of interest if you already have an MBA/MSc/PhD.

BigD


Maybe it's a bit expensive but the atmosphere in Oxford is really incredible. I was there some days ago for job reasons and you feel inspired just by walking the streets!
<blockquote>They also do Diplomas in Financial Strategy, Global Business and Strategy and Innovation. They are very good as they establish a cohort and Oxford vibe at a quarter of the cost of the EMBA, and either act as a feed-in to the intensive EMBA (with financial discount and exemptions) or to cherry-pick areas of interest if you already have an MBA/MSc/PhD. BigD </blockquote> Maybe it's a bit expensive but the atmosphere in Oxford is really incredible. I was there some days ago for job reasons and you feel inspired just by walking the streets!

BigD

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Sep 21, 2012 06:10

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The real value is not clear unless you enquire more closely: the diplomas are organised around a series of modules , exams and thesis. The schedule includes regular events, college dinners and networking activities and invited speakers. I'd recommend the diplomas highly so far as to say I would do another one if it made sense ... :-)

Said has just opened its new Exec wing (on the already impressive new building) to the intention is to separate the Execs on diplomas and EMBA from the young whippersnappers doing the the FT course.

BigD

They also do Diplomas in Financial Strategy, Global Business and Strategy and Innovation. They are very good as they establish a cohort and Oxford vibe at a quarter of the cost of the EMBA, and either act as a feed-in to the intensive EMBA (with financial discount and exemptions) or to cherry-pick areas of interest if you already have an MBA/MSc/PhD.

BigD


Maybe it's a bit expensive but the atmosphere in Oxford is really incredible. I was there some days ago for job reasons and you feel inspired just by walking the streets!
The real value is not clear unless you enquire more closely: the diplomas are organised around a series of modules , exams and thesis. The schedule includes regular events, college dinners and networking activities and invited speakers. I'd recommend the diplomas highly so far as to say I would do another one if it made sense ... :-) Said has just opened its new Exec wing (on the already impressive new building) to the intention is to separate the Execs on diplomas and EMBA from the young whippersnappers doing the the FT course. BigD <blockquote><blockquote>They also do Diplomas in Financial Strategy, Global Business and Strategy and Innovation. They are very good as they establish a cohort and Oxford vibe at a quarter of the cost of the EMBA, and either act as a feed-in to the intensive EMBA (with financial discount and exemptions) or to cherry-pick areas of interest if you already have an MBA/MSc/PhD. BigD </blockquote> Maybe it's a bit expensive but the atmosphere in Oxford is really incredible. I was there some days ago for job reasons and you feel inspired just by walking the streets! </blockquote>

Duncan

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Sep 22, 2012 11:01

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I'd be a little careful about these diplomas. I certainly understand the attraction. However, diploma candidates don't become graduates of the university, join a college, become a member of the university, or gain the matriculated status needed by many of the university's alumni organisations. (See http://www.ox.ac.uk/students/new/yourfirstfewweeks/matriculation/).

Without full alumni status, you can't use the careers services, use Oxford's email forwarding service, or the alumni directory. See the table at https://www.alumni.ox.ac.uk/page.aspx?pid=920

In contrast, the much longer established corporate finance executive programme at LBS, which is the same price and more in-depth, has full alumni status. http://www.london.edu/programmes/executiveeducation/corporatefinanceprogrammeportfolio.html
I'd be a little careful about these diplomas. I certainly understand the attraction. However, diploma candidates don't become graduates of the university, join a college, become a member of the university, or gain the matriculated status needed by many of the university's alumni organisations. (See http://www.ox.ac.uk/students/new/yourfirstfewweeks/matriculation/). Without full alumni status, you can't use the careers services, use Oxford's email forwarding service, or the alumni directory. See the table at https://www.alumni.ox.ac.uk/page.aspx?pid=920 In contrast, the much longer established corporate finance executive programme at LBS, which is the same price and more in-depth, has full alumni status. http://www.london.edu/programmes/executiveeducation/corporatefinanceprogrammeportfolio.html

ezra

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Sep 24, 2012 06:54

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Good point, Duncan.

But these executive education options could work for a certain class of students (like somebody who might be considering an EMBA for the content, already has a job, and doesn't need career services.)
Good point, Duncan. But these executive education options could work for a certain class of students (like somebody who might be considering an EMBA for the content, already has a job, and doesn't need career services.)

BigD

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Sep 24, 2012 06:52

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Most of the students have reasons for not wanting to do the full EMBA, they may have other Masters, PhDs or better things to do. The diplomas are assessed courses and quite challenging. Of course there are alternatives such as the course you mention, or Cambridge Judge does a Financial Management Certificate of Achievement.

No one on the cohort that I spoke to mentioned (a need for) career services :-)

BigD


Good point, Duncan.

But these executive education options could work for a certain class of students (like somebody who might be considering an EMBA for the content, already has a job, and doesn't need career services.)
Most of the students have reasons for not wanting to do the full EMBA, they may have other Masters, PhDs or better things to do. The diplomas are assessed courses and quite challenging. Of course there are alternatives such as the course you mention, or Cambridge Judge does a Financial Management Certificate of Achievement. No one on the cohort that I spoke to mentioned (a need for) career services :-) BigD <blockquote>Good point, Duncan. But these executive education options could work for a certain class of students (like somebody who might be considering an EMBA for the content, already has a job, and doesn't need career services.)</blockquote>

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