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MBA Ranking for Asia

JohnnyL

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Mar 02, 2009 10:50

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Hi there,

I have a short question: Do you know a ranking of Asian or Chinese B-Schools that can be found in the Internet?

Thanks in advance for your short answer.

Best,
JL
Hi there, I have a short question: Do you know a ranking of Asian or Chinese B-Schools that can be found in the Internet? Thanks in advance for your short answer. Best, JL

Evan2007

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Mar 03, 2009 05:40

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Hi again, Johnny. If you're after something pan-Asian and reliable, I think the short answer is no. You can sort the Economist ranking for Asian programs in the Top 10. You get ten or so, but oddly not ISB, INSEAD or ANY school on mainland China. Maybe that's why Economist isn't such a relied-upon international ranking.
Hi again, Johnny. If you're after something pan-Asian and reliable, I think the short answer is no. You can sort the Economist ranking for Asian programs in the Top 10. You get ten or so, but oddly not ISB, INSEAD or ANY school on mainland China. Maybe that's why Economist isn't such a relied-upon international ranking.

Mar 22, 2009 04:20

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Financial Times doesn't have a good list of Asian colleges either. Among the lists that I have seen - EIU still seems to list the most asian colleges
Financial Times doesn't have a good list of Asian colleges either. Among the lists that I have seen - EIU still seems to list the most asian colleges

Apr 16, 2009 03:02

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in china, there are TOP FOUR universities ,

TSINGHUA, PERKING, SHANGHAI TRANSPORTATION AND
FUDAN university.

above mentioned are the first tier ,
besides CEIBS and CHANGJIANG who need GMAT rather than NATIONAL EXAM , which was hold annually for other universities in whole china.
in china, there are TOP FOUR universities , TSINGHUA, PERKING, SHANGHAI TRANSPORTATION AND FUDAN university. above mentioned are the first tier , besides CEIBS and CHANGJIANG who need GMAT rather than NATIONAL EXAM , which was hold annually for other universities in whole china.

duhang

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Apr 21, 2009 08:56

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in china, there are TOP FOUR universities ,

TSINGHUA, PERKING, SHANGHAI TRANSPORTATION AND
FUDAN university.

above mentioned are the first tier ,
besides CEIBS and CHANGJIANG who need GMAT rather than NATIONAL EXAM , which was hold annually for other universities in whole china.

dude, there is no Shanghai Transportation University, it should be Shanghai Jiao Tong University(SJTU). Its Antai College of Economics and Management actually ranked top 50 in FT. Tsinghua, Peking, Fudan and SJTU are IB target school domestically. There pre-experience master programs graduates are highly-sought due to their tough entrance exam, similar to the case of IIMs and IITs in India.

Local employers don't value MBAs as much as their Western counterparts. Locally-renown mba programs are CKGSB(Cheung Kong) and CEIBS, they tend to be very influential in mainland and has biggest alum network.

For those MBA programs associated with universities, MBA students are usually regarded as inferior to undergrads and grads in the same campus. The reason is those guys only take a GMAT-like entrance exam in Chinese, not the ordinary Graduate Entrance Exam which include much more difficult maths and related subject exams.
<blockquote>in china, there are TOP FOUR universities , TSINGHUA, PERKING, SHANGHAI TRANSPORTATION AND FUDAN university. above mentioned are the first tier , besides CEIBS and CHANGJIANG who need GMAT rather than NATIONAL EXAM , which was hold annually for other universities in whole china.</blockquote> dude, there is no Shanghai Transportation University, it should be Shanghai Jiao Tong University(SJTU). Its Antai College of Economics and Management actually ranked top 50 in FT. Tsinghua, Peking, Fudan and SJTU are IB target school domestically. There pre-experience master programs graduates are highly-sought due to their tough entrance exam, similar to the case of IIMs and IITs in India. Local employers don't value MBAs as much as their Western counterparts. Locally-renown mba programs are CKGSB(Cheung Kong) and CEIBS, they tend to be very influential in mainland and has biggest alum network. For those MBA programs associated with universities, MBA students are usually regarded as inferior to undergrads and grads in the same campus. The reason is those guys only take a GMAT-like entrance exam in Chinese, not the ordinary Graduate Entrance Exam which include much more difficult maths and related subject exams.

nikifori

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Apr 23, 2009 10:04

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Hi there,

I have a short question: Do you know a ranking of Asian or Chinese B-Schools that can be found in the Internet?

Thanks in advance for your short answer.

Best,
JL


tokyo unversity is an excellent れ choice but for珍 overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia
<blockquote>Hi there, I have a short question: Do you know a ranking of Asian or Chinese B-Schools that can be found in the Internet? Thanks in advance for your short answer. Best, JL</blockquote> tokyo unversity is an excellent &#12428; choice&#12288;but&#12288;for&#29645; overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia

andy.j.

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Apr 23, 2009 02:29

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So, Johnny - 2nd thoughts about studying in Germany ?
So, Johnny - 2nd thoughts about studying in Germany ?

Malia

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Apr 23, 2009 10:03

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tokyo unversity is an excellent れ choice but for珍 overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia


I did not know that there's an MBA at Tokyo University.
<blockquote>tokyo unversity is an excellent &#12428; choice&#12288;but&#12288;for&#29645; overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia</blockquote> I did not know that there's an MBA at Tokyo University.

duhang

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Apr 24, 2009 11:59

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tokyo unversity is an excellent れ choice but for珍 overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia


I did not know that there's an MBA at Tokyo University.

me neither.
I do know there is a mba program within Kyoto University.
But while there MBAs are not valued in their university's home country, how can anybody expect Japan-made MBAs can be respected anywhere in other places.
<blockquote><blockquote>tokyo unversity is an excellent &#12428; choice&#12288;but&#12288;for&#29645; overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia</blockquote> I did not know that there's an MBA at Tokyo University.</blockquote> me neither. I do know there is a mba program within Kyoto University. But while there MBAs are not valued in their university's home country, how can anybody expect Japan-made MBAs can be respected anywhere in other places.

Apr 24, 2009 11:25

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I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.
I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.

pintos

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Apr 25, 2009 08:47

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I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.


right on...
hkust recently signed a co-operation agreement with Saudi Aramco. these guys are big time.
http://www.bm.ust.hk/bm/Web/PressReleasePage.aspx?PressReleaseId=139&Version=English
<blockquote>I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.</blockquote> right on... hkust recently signed a co-operation agreement with Saudi Aramco. these guys are big time. http://www.bm.ust.hk/bm/Web/PressReleasePage.aspx?PressReleaseId=139&Version=English

Aug 06, 2009 04:35

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I really seek pardon to disagree with that.......According to me there are 4 broad categories of MBA schools in Asia....

Cat 1 :- Truly World Class - INSEAD / CEIBS

Cat2 :- Regional but good institutes - NUS/HKUST/ISB

Cat3 :- Colleges with good standings - IIM's / CUHK/ NTU

Cat4 :- The one which need improvements..

Regards,


I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.
I really seek pardon to disagree with that.......According to me there are 4 broad categories of MBA schools in Asia.... Cat 1 :- Truly World Class - INSEAD / CEIBS Cat2 :- Regional but good institutes - NUS/HKUST/ISB Cat3 :- Colleges with good standings - IIM's / CUHK/ NTU Cat4 :- The one which need improvements.. Regards, <blockquote>I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.</blockquote>

Aug 10, 2009 09:55

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I really seek pardon to disagree with that.......According to me there are 4 broad categories of MBA schools in Asia....

Cat 1 :- Truly World Class - INSEAD / CEIBS

Cat2 :- Regional but good institutes - NUS/HKUST/ISB

Cat3 :- Colleges with good standings - IIM's / CUHK/ NTU

Cat4 :- The one which need improvements..

Regards,


I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.


what is your definition of world class?

placing Insead and CEIBS in the same line begs for a lawsuit.
<blockquote>I really seek pardon to disagree with that.......According to me there are 4 broad categories of MBA schools in Asia.... Cat 1 :- Truly World Class - INSEAD / CEIBS Cat2 :- Regional but good institutes - NUS/HKUST/ISB Cat3 :- Colleges with good standings - IIM's / CUHK/ NTU Cat4 :- The one which need improvements.. Regards, <blockquote>I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.</blockquote></blockquote> what is your definition of world class? placing Insead and CEIBS in the same line begs for a lawsuit.

Lowayk

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Sep 27, 2009 12:51

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Hi everybody,

I wonder how reputed is GuanghuaSM outside China ? If I want to work in Hong Kong for example, will this diploma be a real asset ? More generally, I consider working in Asia in the future but not necessarily in China. Compared to a dual degree program with Nanyang university (Singapore), what's the best?

My school (ESSEC, France) has a dual degree program with Guanghua, but it means going 1 year in Peking and that's why I need more information before making my decision...

Thanks
Hi everybody, I wonder how reputed is GuanghuaSM outside China ? If I want to work in Hong Kong for example, will this diploma be a real asset ? More generally, I consider working in Asia in the future but not necessarily in China. Compared to a dual degree program with Nanyang university (Singapore), what's the best? My school (ESSEC, France) has a dual degree program with Guanghua, but it means going 1 year in Peking and that's why I need more information before making my decision... Thanks

lolipop

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Oct 17, 2009 04:58

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I really seek pardon to disagree with that.......According to me there are 4 broad categories of MBA schools in Asia....

Cat 1 :- Truly World Class - INSEAD / CEIBS

Cat2 :- Regional but good institutes - NUS/HKUST/ISB

Cat3 :- Colleges with good standings - IIM's / CUHK/ NTU

Cat4 :- The one which need improvements..

Regards,


I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.


Insead is the sole "truly world class" school in this list.

Hong Kong UST and CEIBS are the only other two where top applicants will apply as back ups, however for CEIBS you absolutely need to speak Mandarin with any hopes of decent job in Shanghai or Beijing.
<blockquote>I really seek pardon to disagree with that.......According to me there are 4 broad categories of MBA schools in Asia.... Cat 1 :- Truly World Class - INSEAD / CEIBS Cat2 :- Regional but good institutes - NUS/HKUST/ISB Cat3 :- Colleges with good standings - IIM's / CUHK/ NTU Cat4 :- The one which need improvements.. Regards, <blockquote>I'd say that any ranks are debatable, but Montauk's book will give you some good idea. Generally, HKUST is regarded as the best B-school in Asia.</blockquote></blockquote> Insead is the sole "truly world class" school in this list. Hong Kong UST and CEIBS are the only other two where top applicants will apply as back ups, however for CEIBS you absolutely need to speak Mandarin with any hopes of decent job in Shanghai or Beijing.

Jan 03, 2010 01:24

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Go check the ranking in Sino Manager, which is most reputable MBA ranking in China.

http://www.sino-manager.com/NewsShow.aspx?PostID=742

Tsinghua SEM-MIT Sloan IMBA program has been consecutively ranked 1# for 4 years ever since this ranking started!
Go check the ranking in Sino Manager, which is most reputable MBA ranking in China. http://www.sino-manager.com/NewsShow.aspx?PostID=742 Tsinghua SEM-MIT Sloan IMBA program has been consecutively ranked 1# for 4 years ever since this ranking started!

JohnnyL

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Jan 03, 2010 06:07

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Thank you very much for that. Unfortunately, I do not understand Chinese. Can the ranking be found anywhere in an English version?
Thank you very much for that. Unfortunately, I do not understand Chinese. Can the ranking be found anywhere in an English version?

Feb 22, 2010 04:10

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Johnny,
At this time, there are no comprehensive rankings that include all the top Chinese Schools and international schools. You can either look at the FT or EIU for international school rankings with a smattering of Chinese schools or you can look at Sino Manager for rankings of Chinese programs but not international programs.

The FT currently requires that schools be accredited with AACSB or EQUIS, and as of right now, I think that CEIBS, Tsinghua, Shanghai Jiaotong, and Fudan are the only schools currently accredit by either accreditation organization (someone correct me if I've left off school). The EIU rankings are by invitation by the EIU so conceivably they'll invite Chinese schools in the future.

In reality, there are two competing factors in the rankings that make comparisons very hard. First, all Chinese programs will do well relative to international programs for the simple reason that salaries in China are going up faster then in other parts of the world. Offsetting this is the reality that Chinese universities have student to teacher ratios that are 3 to 5 times higher than in international schools and their research productivity, as measured by either the FT or the EIU, is likely to be 1/10th that of a top international school. As a result, you can have schools rank well internationally even though the actual learning environment is not on par with the ranking.
Johnny, At this time, there are no comprehensive rankings that include all the top Chinese Schools and international schools. You can either look at the FT or EIU for international school rankings with a smattering of Chinese schools or you can look at Sino Manager for rankings of Chinese programs but not international programs. The FT currently requires that schools be accredited with AACSB or EQUIS, and as of right now, I think that CEIBS, Tsinghua, Shanghai Jiaotong, and Fudan are the only schools currently accredit by either accreditation organization (someone correct me if I've left off school). The EIU rankings are by invitation by the EIU so conceivably they'll invite Chinese schools in the future. In reality, there are two competing factors in the rankings that make comparisons very hard. First, all Chinese programs will do well relative to international programs for the simple reason that salaries in China are going up faster then in other parts of the world. Offsetting this is the reality that Chinese universities have student to teacher ratios that are 3 to 5 times higher than in international schools and their research productivity, as measured by either the FT or the EIU, is likely to be 1/10th that of a top international school. As a result, you can have schools rank well internationally even though the actual learning environment is not on par with the ranking.

duhang

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Feb 22, 2010 04:24

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Let me add one school.
BIMBA, one outreach program taught by Peking & Vlerick faculties with one triple-accredited vlerick degree. Offered in beautiful Langrun Garden in PKU, sounds like ads huh?
Also, SJTU run several joint-programs with UBC, Euromed, but to my knowledge, these programs mainly target domestic students and/or expats in respective regions.
Tsinghua, Fudan and Lingnan international MBA programs are supported by MIT Sloan through faculty exchange and curriculum design, it states everyone will awarded one certificare from MIT Sloan in addition to their home degrees. Although a certificate doesn't enable you stand out before prospective employer, anyway through these supports, you can expect a minimal quality of teaching, at least those textbooks are offered by MIT Sloan for free and are on par with international schools.
You come to bschool, want to build your networks and receive basic business trainings. Well-designed curriculum and textbooks, combined with not that bad faculty and local networks, there is no reason to look down upon local Chinese schools.
Let me add one school. BIMBA, one outreach program taught by Peking & Vlerick faculties with one triple-accredited vlerick degree. Offered in beautiful Langrun Garden in PKU, sounds like ads huh? Also, SJTU run several joint-programs with UBC, Euromed, but to my knowledge, these programs mainly target domestic students and/or expats in respective regions. Tsinghua, Fudan and Lingnan international MBA programs are supported by MIT Sloan through faculty exchange and curriculum design, it states everyone will awarded one certificare from MIT Sloan in addition to their home degrees. Although a certificate doesn't enable you stand out before prospective employer, anyway through these supports, you can expect a minimal quality of teaching, at least those textbooks are offered by MIT Sloan for free and are on par with international schools. You come to bschool, want to build your networks and receive basic business trainings. Well-designed curriculum and textbooks, combined with not that bad faculty and local networks, there is no reason to look down upon local Chinese schools.

Feb 22, 2010 04:15

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Just to be clear, I'm not looking down at Chinese schools, but I'm also not looking up at them. Looking eye to eye, I see strengths and weaknesses. The best schools in China have prestigous brands that attract great peers in the classroom (strength). Their faculty, however, simply don't compare with the faculty in the top tier international schools, either as teachers or researchers (weaknesses). When you apply for a program, make sure you know want, and go for programs that can deliver what you want. Overall rankings mean very little.
Just to be clear, I'm not looking down at Chinese schools, but I'm also not looking up at them. Looking eye to eye, I see strengths and weaknesses. The best schools in China have prestigous brands that attract great peers in the classroom (strength). Their faculty, however, simply don't compare with the faculty in the top tier international schools, either as teachers or researchers (weaknesses). When you apply for a program, make sure you know want, and go for programs that can deliver what you want. Overall rankings mean very little.

strekstar

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Feb 22, 2010 08:39

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I would agree - anyone that has the opportunity should sit in a class or at the minimum, observe an on-line class at a Stanford, MIT, or Harvard (example - Michael Porter's classes). The students make the class very intimidating due to their expertise and preparation for each case study or class. The problem in China is that this is not the culture - regardless if it is HKUST, CEIBS, or Tsinghua. Classes are more lecture formats. Many MBAs in the United States top 20 do not carry this environment as well.

If the goal of the MBA is building a Chinese network and improving financial skills, this should not be a big concern.

However, there is a caveat. If you really want to be intimidated, take a class in Chinese at the Tsinghua MBA and you come close to the level of HArvard and Stanford. The professors who lecture in Chinese at this school are the country's best and smartest - as they daily advise government officials on some of the world's most important issues. The English MBA there allows you to take classes in Chinese. Thus, those with Chinese background (or an undergrad in Chinese language) stand to gain the most by attending Chinese programs. For non-Chinese, getting your Chinese to graduate level classes will take 3 to 4 years if you have not studied at all. This assumes the professor allows you to hand in assignments in English.
I would agree - anyone that has the opportunity should sit in a class or at the minimum, observe an on-line class at a Stanford, MIT, or Harvard (example - Michael Porter's classes). The students make the class very intimidating due to their expertise and preparation for each case study or class. The problem in China is that this is not the culture - regardless if it is HKUST, CEIBS, or Tsinghua. Classes are more lecture formats. Many MBAs in the United States top 20 do not carry this environment as well. If the goal of the MBA is building a Chinese network and improving financial skills, this should not be a big concern. However, there is a caveat. If you really want to be intimidated, take a class in Chinese at the Tsinghua MBA and you come close to the level of HArvard and Stanford. The professors who lecture in Chinese at this school are the country's best and smartest - as they daily advise government officials on some of the world's most important issues. The English MBA there allows you to take classes in Chinese. Thus, those with Chinese background (or an undergrad in Chinese language) stand to gain the most by attending Chinese programs. For non-Chinese, getting your Chinese to graduate level classes will take 3 to 4 years if you have not studied at all. This assumes the professor allows you to hand in assignments in English.

ArunS

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Jan 11, 2011 04:51

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Here's a ranking of the most popular MBA programs in Asia:
http://www.find-mba.com/most-popular/asia
Here's a ranking of the most popular MBA programs in Asia: http://www.find-mba.com/most-popular/asia

Evan2007

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Jan 12, 2011 05:29

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University of Malaya is "more popular" than INSEAD and ISB? Uh, ok.
University of Malaya is "more popular" than INSEAD and ISB? Uh, ok.

ArunS

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Jan 17, 2011 08:46

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I was suprised to see some Malaysian schools on top of that list, too. Any reason for that? I don't think many international applicants consider Malaysia as an MBA destination.
I was suprised to see some Malaysian schools on top of that list, too. Any reason for that? I don't think many international applicants consider Malaysia as an MBA destination.

Evan2007

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Jan 18, 2011 06:37

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The reason? Uh, I dunno. Maybe demand in Malaysia for a local MBA is high. I don't know of any Malaysian business school that would resonate in Europe or North America (doesn't mean there aren't any).
The reason? Uh, I dunno. Maybe demand in Malaysia for a local MBA is high. I don't know of any Malaysian business school that would resonate in Europe or North America (doesn't mean there aren't any).

$hekhar

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Jan 26, 2011 07:33

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what about the IIMs?
what about the IIMs?

rawishon

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Sep 24, 2011 08:36

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tokyo unversity is an excellent れ choice but for珍 overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia


I did not know that there's an MBA at Tokyo University.

me neither.
I do know there is a mba program within Kyoto University.
But while there MBAs are not valued in their university's home country, how can anybody expect Japan-made MBAs can be respected anywhere in other places.


Will that mean to graduate MBA from Kyoto University not be world wide recognize_?
<blockquote><blockquote><blockquote>tokyo unversity is an excellent &#12428; choice&#12288;but&#12288;for&#29645; overall hkust is the best and most reputed program in asia</blockquote> I did not know that there's an MBA at Tokyo University.</blockquote> me neither. I do know there is a mba program within Kyoto University. But while there MBAs are not valued in their university's home country, how can anybody expect Japan-made MBAs can be respected anywhere in other places. </blockquote> Will that mean to graduate MBA from Kyoto University not be world wide recognize_?

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